Tag Archives: cyber risk

Risky World

The latest World Economic Forum report on global risks is out today and, as usual, it reflects current concerns rather than offering any predictions for 2017. To be fair to WEF, the top risk for 2012 to 2014 inclusive in their survey was income disparity which is commonly viewed as one of the factors behind the rise in populism.

click to enlargewef-global-risks-2017

The report states the obvious about the impact on global risks following 2016, specifically that “societal polarization, income inequality and the inward orientation of countries are spilling over into real-world politics” and that “decision-making is increasingly influenced by emotions” due to the increase in nationalism. Where this year’s report is spot on, in my view, is in relation to the top 5 global trends that will determine global developments over the next 10 years, as below.

click to enlargewef-top-5-global-trends-2017

The report also states that “although anti-establishment politics tends to blame globalization for deteriorating domestic job prospects, evidence suggests that managing technological change is a more important challenge for labour markets” and that “we are in a highly disruptive phase of technological development, at a time of rising challenges to social cohesion and policy-makers’ legitimacy”.

Among the many risks highlighted in the report is a reduction in geopolitical co-operation which is likely to be detrimental to global growth, action on global indebtedness, and climate change.  It’s particularly depressing to think that even if the commitments under the Paris agreement were delivered, which now looks doomed after the election of Trump, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) estimates the world will still warm by 3.0°C to 3.2°C, still far above the 2°C limit where scary and irreversible stuff happens.

Another worrying risk is the possibility of a new arms race in an era of rapid advancements in a technology which also has a retrograde feel, especially “while risks intersect and technologies develop quickly, too often our institutions for governing international security remain reactive and slow-moving”.

All pretty cheery stuff! And on it goes.

As I write this, I’m watching reports on Mr Trump’s press conference today, and although there is no doubt that our world is riskier as we enter 2017, it will be entertaining to see this guy as the leader of the free world. Hopefully good entertaining, not depressing entertaining!

Pimping the Peers (Part 2)

In the last post on this topic, I highlighted how new technologies, broadly under the fintech tag, had the potential to disrupt the banking sector, primarily by means of automating processes rather than any major reinventing of business models (although I did end that post with a bit of a rant about innovation and human behaviour). Blockchain is the hot topic that seems to be cropping up everywhere (I’ll leave that for another time). This post is about insurance and new technology, or in the jargon, insurtech.

The traditional business model in the insurance industry is not reacting well to a world of low or negative interest rates. For the life insurance sector, the duration mismatch between their liabilities and their assets is having a perverse impact as interest rates have fallen. Savings returns for aging populations have been sacrificed in Central Bank’s attempt to stimulate economic growth.

In addition, the traditional distribution channel for selling life insurer’s products, and the old adage is that these products are sold rather than bought, has relied too heavily on aging tied agents whose focus is on the wealthy client that can generate more fees than the middle class. The industry is generally at a loss on how to sell products in a low interest world to the mass market and to the new tech savvy generation. As a result, the industry and others are throwing money at a rash of new start-ups in insurance, as the exhibit on some of the current hyped firms focusing on life insurance below illustrates.

click to enlargelife-insurance-big-data

As the exhibit illustrates, the focus of these new start-ups is weighted towards technologies around product development, distribution, and underwriting. Some will likely succeed in trying to differentiate further the existing clientele of life insurers (e.g. real time health data). Many will be gobbled up or disappear. Differing attitudes between those aged under 34 and the older generation towards online distribution channels can be clearly seen in the survey results in the exhibit below.

click to enlargeattitudes-to-life-insurance-distribution-channels

With longevity and low interest rates the dominant challenges for life insurers today, automation of processes will assist in cutting expenses in the provision of products (mainly to the existing customer base) but will not likely meaningfully address the twin elephants in the room.  Citigroup reckons that in 20 of the largest OECD countries the unfunded government liability for pensions is around $78 trillion which compares to approximately $50 trillion in GDP for all OECD countries in 2015. I look forward to conversing with a robo-advisor in the near future on what products it recommends for that problem!

Insurance itself is hundreds of years old and although the wonderfully namely bottomry (the earliest form of marine hull insurance) or ancient burial societies are early examples, non-life insurance really took off with mass markets after the great fire of London in 1666.

The most hyped example of insurtech in the non-life sector is the impact of technologies on the motor business like drive-less cars and car telematics. This paper from Swiss Re shows that the impact over the next 20 years of such advances on motor premia could be dramatic.

Much of the focus from insurtech innovation is on reducing expenses, an item that the industry is not light on. The graph below shows examples of the level of acquisition and overhead expenses in the non-life sector across different jurisdictions.

click to enlargenonlife-expense-ratios

A recent report from Aon Benfield went further and looked at expenses across the value chain in the US P&C insurance sector, as below. Aon Benfield estimated overall expenses make up approximately half of gross risk premium, much of which represents juicy disruption targets for new technology in the insurtech world.

click to enlargeexpenses-across-the-value-chain

Insurance itself is based upon the law of large numbers and serves a socially useful function in reducing economic volatility by transferring risks from businesses and consumers. In 1906, Alfred Manes defined insurance as “an economic institution resting on the principle of mutuality, established for the purpose of supplying a fund, the need for which arises from a chance occurrence whose probability can be estimated”.

One of the issues identified with the current non-life insurance sector is the so-called protection gap. This is in effect where insurers’ risk management practises have got incredibly adapt at identifying and excluding those risks most likely to result in a claim. Although good for profits, it does bring the social usefulness of the transference of only the pristine risks into question (for everybody else). The graph below from Swiss Re illustrates the point by showing economic and insured losses from natural catastrophe events as a % of GDP.

click to enlargeinsurance-protection-gap-uninsured-vrs-insured-losses

It’s in the context of low investment returns and competitive underwriting markets (in themselves being driven by low risk premia across asset classes) that a new technology driven approach to the mutual insurance model is being used to attack expense and protection gap issues.

Mutuals represent the original business model for many insurers (back to burial schemes and the great fire of 1666) and still represent approximately a third of the sector in the US and Europe today. Peer to peer insurers are what some are calling the new technology driven mutuals. In fact, most of the successful P2P models to date, firms like Guevara, Friendsurance, and Inspeer are really intermediaries who pool consumers together for group discounts or self-financing of high deductibles.

Lemonade, which launched in New York this week, is a peer to peer platform which issues its own insurance policies and seeks to address the protection gap issue by offering broader coverage. The firm has been heavily reinsured by some big names in insurance like Berkshire Hathaway and Lloyd’s. It offers a fee based model, whereby the policyholders pay claims through mutualisation (assumingly by pools determined by pre-defined criteria). Daniel Schreiber, CEO and co-founder of Lemonade says that the firm will be ”the only insurer that doesn’t make money by denying claims”. Dan Ariely, a big deal in the world of Behavioral Economics, has been named as Chief Behavioral Officer, presumably in an effort to assist in constructing pools of well behaved policyholders.

The graphic below tries to illustrate how the business model is evolving (or should that be repeating?). Technology offers policyholders the opportunity to join with others to pool risk, hitherto a process that was confined to associations amongst professional groups or groups bound by location. Whether technology offers the same opportunity to underwrite risks profitably (or at least not at a loss) but with a larger reach remains to be seen.

click to enlargeinsurance-business-models

It does occur to me that it may be successful in addressing areas of dislocation in the industry, such as shortfalls in coverage for flood insurance, where a common risk and mitigant can be identified and addressed in the terms of the respective pool taking the risks on.

For specialty re/insurers, we have already seen a bifurcation between the capital providers/risk takers and the risk portfolio managers in the ILS arena. Newer technology driven mutual based insurers also offer the industry a separation of the management of risk pools and the risk capital provided to underwrite them. I wish them well in their attempts at updating this most ancient of businesses and I repeat what I said in part 1 of this post – don’t let the sweet scent of shiny new technology distract you from the smell of the risk…..

Low risk premia and leverage

The buzz from the annual insurance speed dating festival in Monte Carlo last week seems to have been subdued. Amid all the gossip about the M&A bubble, insurers and reinsurers tried to talk up a slowing of the rate of price decreases. Matt Weber of Swiss Re said “We’ve seen a slowing down of price decreases, although prices are not yet stable. We believe the trend will continue and we’ll see a stabilisation very soon”. However, analysts are not so sure. Moody’s stated that “despite strong signs that a more rational marketplace is emerging in terms of pricing, the expansion of alternative capital markets continues to threaten the traditional reinsurance business models”.  Fitch commented that “a number of fundamental factors that influence pricing remain negative” and that “some reinsurers view defending market share by writing business below the technical price floor as being an acceptable risk”. KBW comment that on-going pricing pressures will “eventually compressing underwriting margins below acceptable returns”.

It is no surprise then that much of the official comments from firms focused on new markets and innovation. Moody’s states that “innovation is a defence against ongoing disintermediation, which is likely to become more pronounced in areas in which reinsurers are not able to maintain proprietary expertise”. Munich Re cited developing new forms of reinsurance cover and partnering with hi-tech industries to create covers for emerging risks in high growth industries. Aon Benfield highlighted three areas of potential growth – products based upon advanced data and analytics (for example in wider indemnification for financial institutions or pharmaceuticals), emerging risks such as cyber, and covering risks currently covered by public pools (like flood or mortgage credit). Others think the whole business model will change fundamentally. Stephan Ruoff of Tokio Millennium Re said “the traditional insurance and reinsurance value chain is breaking up and transforming”. Robert DeRose of AM Best commented that reinsurers “will have a greater transformer capital markets operation”.

Back in April 2013, I posed the question of whether financial innovation always ends in reduced risk premia (here). The risk adjusted ROE today from a well spread portfolio of property catastrophe business is reportingly somewhere between 6% and 12% today (depending upon who you ask and on how they calculate risk adjusted capital). Although I’d be inclined to believe more in the lower range, the results are likely near or below the cost of capital for most reinsurers. That leads you to the magic of diversification and the over hyped “non-correlated” feature of certain insurance risks to other asset classes. There’s little point in reiterating my views on those arguments as per previous posts here, here and here.

In the last post cited above, I commented that “the use by insurers of their economic capital models for reinsurance/retrocession purchases is a trend that is only going to increase as we enter into the risk based solvency world under Solvency II”. Dennis Sugrue of S&P said “we take some comfort from the strength of European reinsurers’ capital modelling capabilities”, which can’t but enhance the reputation of regulatory approved models under Solvency II. Some ILS funds, such as Twelve Capital, have set up subordinated debt funds in anticipation of the demand for regulatory capital (and provide a good comparison of sub-debt and reinsurance here).

One interesting piece of news from Monte Carlo was the establishment of a fund by Guy Carpenter and a new firm founded by ex-PwC partners called Vario Partners. Vario states on their website they were “established to increase the options to insurers looking to optimise capital in a post-Solvency II environment” and are proposing private bonds with collateral structured as quota share type arrangements with loss trigger points at 1-in-100 or 1-in-200 probabilities. I am guessing that the objective of the capital relief focussed structures, which presumably will use Vario proprietary modelling capabilities, is to allow investors a return by offering insurers an ability to leverage capital. As their website saysthe highest RoE is one where the insurer’s shareholders’ equity is geared the most, and therefore [capital] at it’s thinnest”. The sponsors claim that the potential for these bonds could be six times that of the cat bond market. The prospects of allowing capital markets easy access to the large quota share market could add to the woes of the current reinsurance business model.

Low risk premia and leverage. Now that’s a good mix and, by all accounts, the future.

Follow-on (13th October 2015): Below are two graphs from the Q3 report from Lane Financial LLC which highlight the reduced risk premia prevalent in the ILS public cat bond market.

click to enlargeILS Pricing September 2015

click to enlargeILS Price Multiples September 2015