Tag Archives: ROIC

Restrict the Renters?

It is no surprise that the populist revolt against globalisation in many developed countries is causing concern amongst the so called elite. The philosophy of the Economist magazine is based upon its founder’s opposition to the protectionist Corn Laws in 1843. It is therefore predictable that they would mount a strong argument for the benefits of free trade in their latest addition, citing multiple research sources. The Economist concludes that “a three pronged agenda of demand management, active labour-market policies and boosting competition would go a long way to tackling the problems that are unfairly laid at the door of globalisation”.

One of the studies referenced in the Economist articles which catch my eye is that by Jason Furman of the Council of Economic Advisors in the US. The graph below from Furman’s report shows the growth in return on invested capital (excluding goodwill)  of US publically quoted firms and the stunning divergence of those in the top 75th and 90th percentiles.

click to enlargereturn-on-invested-capital-us-nonfinancial-public-firms

These top firms, primarily in the technology sector, have increased their return on invested capital (ROIC) from 3 times the median in the 1990s to 8 times today, dramatically demonstrating their ability to generate economic rent in the digitized world we now live in.

Furman’s report includes the following paragraph:

“Traditionally, price fixing and collusion could be detected in the communications between businesses. The task of detecting undesirable price behaviour becomes more difficult with the use of increasingly complex algorithms for setting prices. This type of algorithmic price setting can lead to undesirable price behaviour, sometimes even unintentionally. The use of advanced machine learning algorithms to set prices and adapt product functionality would further increase opacity. Competition policy in the digital age brings with it new challenges for policymakers.”

IT firms have the highest operating margins of any sector in the S&P500, as can be seen below.

click to enlargesp-500-operating-profit-margins-by-sector

And the increasing size of these technology firms have contributed materially to the increase in the overall operating margin of the S&P500, as can also be seen below. These expanding margins are a big factor in the rise of the equity market since 2009.

click to enlargesp-500-historical-operating-profit-margins

It is somewhat ironic that one of the actions which may be needed to show the benefits of free trade and globalisation to citizens in the developed world is coherent policies to restrict the power of economic rent generating technology giants so prevalent in our world today…

Path of profits

The increase in corporate profits has been one of the factors behind the market run-up (as per posts such as here and here from last year). McKinsey have a new report out called “Playing to win: The new global competition for corporate profits” that predicts a decrease of the current rate of 10% of global GDP back to the 1980 level of below 8% by 2025.

Factors that McKinsey cite for the decline are that the impact of global labour arbitrage and falling interest rates have reached their limits. McKinsey also predict that competitive forces from 2 sources will drive down profits, as per the following extract:

“On one side is an enormous wave of companies based in emerging markets. The most prominent have been operating as industrial giants for decades, but over the past ten to 15 years, they have reached massive scale in their home markets. Now they are expanding globally, just as their predecessors from Japan and South Korea did before them. On the other side, high-tech firms are introducing new business models and striking into new sectors. And the tech (and tech-enabled) firms giants themselves are not the only threat. Powerful digital platforms such as Alibaba and Amazon serve as launching pads for thousands of small and medium-sized enterprises, giving them the reach and resources to challenge larger companies.”

Interesting graphs from the report included those below. One shows the factors contributing to the rise in US corporate profits, as below.

click to enlargeMGI Historical US Corporate Profit Components 1980 to 2013

Another graph shows the variability and median return on invested capital (ROIC) from US firms from 1964 to 2013, as below.

click to enlargeMGI Historical ROIC US Corporates 1964 to 2013

Another shows the reduction in labour inputs by country, as below.

click to enlargeMGI Labor Share of Total Income 1980 to 2012

Another shows the growth in corporate sales by region from 1980 to 2013, as below.

click to enlargeMGI Global Corporate Sales By Region

Another shows the ownership and the ROIC profile of the new competitors, as below.

click to enlargeMGI The New Competitors ownership split & ROIC by region

And finally the graph below shows McKinseys’ projections for EBITDA, EBIT, operating profit, and net income to 2025.

click to enlargeMGI Global Corporate Profits 1980 2013 2025