Tag Archives: Eqecat

The Big Wind

With four US hurricanes and one earthquake in current times, mother nature is reminding us homo-sapiens of her power and her unpredictability. As the massive Hurricane Irma is about to hit Florida, we all hope that the loss of life and damage to people’s lives will be minimal and that the coming days will prove humane. Forgive me if it comes across as insensitive to be posting now on the likely impact of such events on the insurance industry.

For the insurance sector, these events, and particularly Hurricane Irma which is now forecast to move up the west coast of Florida at strength (rather the more destruction path of up the middle of Florida given the maximum forces at the top right-hand side of a hurricane like this one), may be a test on the predictive powers of its models which are so critical to pricing, particularly in the insurance linked securities (ILS) market.

Many commentators, including me (here, here and here are recent examples), have expressed worries in recent years about current market conditions in the specialty insurance, reinsurance and ILS sectors. On Wednesday, Willis Re reported that they estimate their subset of firms analysed are only earning a 3.7% ROE if losses are normalised and reserve releases dried up. David Rule of the Prudential Regulatory Authority in the UK recently stated that London market insurers “appear to be incorporating a more benign view of future losses into their technical pricing”, terms and conditions continued to loosen, reliance on untested new coverages such as cyber insurance is increasing and that insurers “may be too sanguine about catastrophe risks, such as significant weather events”.

With the reinsurance and specialty insurance sectors struggling to meet their cost of capital and pricing terms and conditions being so weak for so long (see this post on the impact of soft pricing on risk profiles), if Hurricane Irma impacts Florida as predicted (i.e. on Saturday) it has the potential to be a capital event for the catastrophe insurance sector rather than just an earnings event. On Friday, Lex in the FT reported that the South-East US makes up 60% of the exposures of the catastrophe insurance market.

The models utilised in the sector are more variable in their output as events get bigger in their impact (e.g. the higher the return period). A 2013 post on the variation in loss estimates from a selected portfolio of standard insurance coverage by the Florida Commission on Hurricane Loss Projection Methodology (FCHLPM) illustrates the point and one of the graphs from that post is reproduced below.

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Based upon the most recent South-East US probable maximum losses (PML) and Atlantic hurricane scenarios from a group of 12 specialty insurers and reinsurers I selected, the graph below shows the net losses by return periods as a percentage of each firm’s net tangible assets. This graph does not consider the impact of hybrid or subordinate debt that may absorb losses before the firm’s capital. I have extrapolated many of these curves based upon industry data on US South-East exceedance curves and judgement on firm’s exposures (and for that reason I anonymised the firms).

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The results of my analysis confirm that specialty insurers and reinsurers, in aggregate, have reduced their South-East US exposures in recent years when I compare average figures to S&P 2014 data (by about 15% for the 1 in 100 return period). Expressed as a net loss ratio, the average for a 1 in 100  and a 1 in 250 return period respectively is 15% and 22%. These figures do look low for events with characteristics of these return periods (the average net loss ratio of the 12 firms from catastrophic events in 2005 and 2011 was 22% and 25% respectively) so it will be fascinating to see what the actual figures are, depending upon how Hurricane Irma pans out. Many firms are utilising their experience and risk management prowess to transfer risks through collaterised reinsurance and retrocession (i.e. reinsurance of reinsurers) to naïve capital market ILS investors.

If the models are correct and maximum losses are around the 1 in 100 return period estimates for Hurricane Irma, well capitalized and managed catastrophe exposed insurers should trade through recent and current events. We will see if the models pass this test. For example, demand surge (whereby labour and building costs increase following a catastrophic event due to overwhelming demand and fixed supply) is a common feature of widespread windstorm damage and is a feature in models (it is one of those inputs that underwriters can play with in soft markets!). Well here’s a thought – could Trump’s immigration policy be a factor in the level of demand surge in Florida and Texas?

The ILS sector is another matter however in my view due to the rapid growth of the private and unregulated collateralised reinsurance and retrocession markets to satisfy the demand for product supply from ILS funds and yield seeking investors. The prevalence of aggregate covers and increased expected loss attachments in the private ILS market resembles features of previous soft and overheated retrocession markets (generally before a crash) in bygone years. I have expressed my concerns on this market many times (more recently here). Hurricane Irma has the potential to really test underwriting standards across the ILS sector. The graph below from Lane Financial LLC on the historical pricing of US military insurer USAA’s senior catastrophe bonds again illustrates how the market has taken on more risk for less risk adjusted premium (exposures include retired military personnel living in Florida).

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The events in the coming days may tell us, to paraphrase Mr Buffet, who has been swimming naked or as Lex put it on Friday, “this weekend may be a moment when the search for uncorrelated returns bumps hard into acts of God”.

Hopefully, all parts of the catastrophe insurance sector will prove their worth by speedily indemnifying peoples’ material losses (nothing can indemnify the loss of life). After all, that’s its function and economic utility to society. Longer term, recent events may also lead to more debate and real action been taken to ensure that the insurance sector, in all its guises, can have an increased economic function and relevance in an increasingly uncertain world, in insuring perils such as floods for example (and avoiding the ridiculous political interference in risk transfer markets that has made the financial impact of flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Texas so severe).

Notwithstanding the insurance sector, our thoughts must be with the people who will suffer from nature’s recent wrath and our prayers are with all of those negatively affected now and in the future.

CAT models and fat tails: an illustration from Florida

I have posted numerous times now (to the point of boring myself!) on the dangers of relying on a single model for estimating losses from natural catastrophes. The practise is reportedly widespread in the rapidly growing ILS fund sector. The post on assessing probable maximum losses (PMLs) outlined the sources of uncertainty from such models, especially the widely used commercial vendors models from RMS, AIR and EqeCat.

The Florida Commission on Hurricane Loss Projection Methodology (FCHLPM) was created in 1995 as an independent panel of experts to evaluate computer models used for setting rates for residential property insurance. The website of the FCHLPM contains a treasure trove of information on each of the modelling firms who provide detailed submissions in a pre-set format. These submissions include specifics on the methodology utilised in their models and the output from their models for specified portfolios.

In addition to the three vendor modellers (RMS, AIR, EqeCat), there is also details on two other models approved by FCHLPM, namely Applied Research Associates (ARA) and the Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model (FPHLM)developed by the Florida International University.

In one section of the mandated submissions, the predictions of each of the models on the number of annual landfall hurricanes for a 112 year period (1900 to 2011 is the historical reference period) are outlined. Given the issue over the wind speed classification of Super-storm Sandy as it hit land and the use of hurricane deductibles, I assume that the definition of landfall hurricanes is consistent between the FCHLPM submissions. The graph below shows the assumed frequency over 112 years of 0,1,2,3 or 4 landfall hurricanes from the five modellers.

click to enlargeLandfalling Florida Hurricanes

As one of the objectives of the FCHLPM is to ensure insurance rates are neither excessive nor inadequate, it is unsurprising that each of the models closely matches known history. It does however demonstrate that the models are, in effect, limited by that known history (100 odd years in terms of climatic experiences is limited by any stretch!). One item to note is that most of the models have a higher frequency for 1 landfall hurricane and a lower frequency for 2 landfall hurricanes when compared with the 100 year odd history. Another item of note is that only EqeCat and FPHLM have any frequency for 4 landfall hurricanes in any one year over the reference period.

Each of the modellers are also required to detail their loss exceedance estimates for two assumed risk portfolios. The first portfolio is set by FCHLPM and is limited to 3 construction types, geocodes by ZIP code centroil (always be wary of anti-selection dangers in relying on centroil data, particularly in large counties or zones with a mixture of coastal and inland exposure), and specific policy conditions. The second portfolio is the 2007 Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund aggregate personal and commercial residential exposure data. The graphs below show the results for the different models with the dotted lines representing the 95th percentile margin of error around the average of all 5 model outputs.

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Modelled Losses Florida Notional Residential PortfolioModelled Losses FHCF Commercial Residential Portfolio

As would be expected, uncertainty over losses increase as the return periods increase. The tail of outputs from catastrophe models clearly need to be treated will care and tails need to be fatten up to take into account uncertainty. Relying solely on a single point from a single model is just asking for trouble.

Assessing reinsurers’ catastrophe PMLs

Prior to the recent market wobbles on what a post QE world will look like, a number of reinsurers with relatively high property catastrophe exposures have suffered pullbacks in their stock due to fears about catastrophe pricing pressures (subject of previous post). Credit Suisse downgraded Validus recently stating that “reinsurance has become more of a commodity due to lower barriers to entry and vendor models.”

As we head deeper into the US hurricane season, it is worth reviewing the disclosures of a number of reinsurers in relation to catastrophe exposures, specifically their probable maximum losses or PMLs . In 2012 S&P’s influential annual publication – Global Reinsurance Highlights – there is an interesting article called “Just How Much Capital Is At Risk”. The article looked at net PMLs as a percentage of total adjusted capital (TAC), an S&P determined calculation, and also examined relative tail heaviness of PMLs disclosed by different companies. The article concluded that “by focusing on tail heaviness, we may have one additional tool to uncover which reinsurers could be most affected by such an event”. In other words, not only is the amount of the PMLs for different perils important but the shape of the curve across different return periods (e.g. 1 in 50 years, 1 in 100 years, 1 in 250 years, etc.) is also an important indicator of relative exposures. The graphs below show the net PMLs as a percentage of TAC and the net PMLs as a percentage of aggregate limits for the S&P sample of insurers and reinsurers.

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PML as % of S&P capital

PML as % of aggregate limit

Given the uncertainties around reported PMLs discussed in this post, I particularly like seeing PMLs as a percentage of aggregate limits. In the days before the now common use of catastrophic models (by such vendor firms as RMS, AIR and Eqecat), underwriters would subjectively calculate their PMLs as a percentage of their maximum possible loss or MPL (in the past when unlimited coverage was more common an estimate of the maximum loss was made whereas today the MPL is simply the sum of aggregate limits). This practise, being subjective, was obviously open to abuse (and often proved woefully inadequate). It is interesting to note however that some of the commonly used MPL percentages applied for peak exposures in certain markets were higher than those used today from the vendor models at high return periods.

The vendor modellers themselves are very open about the limitations in their models and regularly discuss the sources of uncertainty in their models. There are two main areas of uncertainty – primary and secondary – highlighted in the models. Some also refer to tertiary uncertainty in the uses of model outputs.

Primary uncertainty relates to the uncertainty in determining events in time, in space, in intensity, and in spatial distribution. There is often limited historical data (sampling error) to draw upon, particularly for large events. For example, scientific data on the physical characteristics of historical events such as hurricanes or earthquakes are only as reliable for the past 100 odd years as the instruments available at the time of the event. Even then, due to changes in factors like population density, the space over which many events were recorded may lack important physical elements of the event. Also, there are many unknowns relating to catastrophic events and we are continuously learning new facts as this article on the 2011 Japan quake illustrates.

Each of the vendor modellers build a catalogue of possible events by supplementing known historical events with other possible events (i.e. they fit a tail to known sample). Even though the vendor modellers stress that they do not predict events, their event catalogues determine implied probabilities that are now dominant in the catastrophe reinsurance pricing discovery process. These catalogues are subject to external validation from institutions such as Florida Commission which certifies models for use in setting property rates (and have an interest in ensuring rates stay as low as possible).

Secondary uncertainty relates to data on possible damages from an event like soil type, property structures, construction materials, location and aspect, building standards and such like factors (other factors include liquefaction, landslides, fires following an event, business interruption, etc.). Considerable strides, especially in the US, have taken place in reducing secondary uncertainties in developed insurance markets as databases have grown although Asia and parts of Europe still lag.

A Guy Carpenter report from December 2011 on uncertainty in models estimates crude confidence levels of -40%/+90% for PMLs at national level and -60%/+170% for PMLs at State level. These are significant levels and illustrate how all loss estimates produced by models must be treated with care and a healthy degree of scepticism.

Disclosures by reinsurers have also improved in recent years in relation to specific events. In the recent past, many reinsurers simply disclosed point estimates for their largest losses. Some still do. Indeed some, such as the well-respected Renaissance Re, still do not disclose any such figures on the basis that such disclosures are often misinterpreted by analysts and investors. Those that do disclose figures do so with comprehensive disclaimers. One of my favourites is “investors should not rely on information provided when considering an investment in the company”!

Comparing disclosed PMLs between reinsurers is rife with difficulty. Issues to consider include how firms define zonal areas, whether they use a vendor model or a proprietary model, whether model options such as storm surge are included, how model results are blended, and annual aggregation methodologies. These are all critical considerations and the detail provided in reinsurers’ disclosures is often insufficient to make a detailed determination. An example of the difficulty is comparing the disclosures of two of the largest reinsurers – Munich Re and Swiss Re. Both disclose PMLs for Atlantic wind and European storm on a 1 in 200 year return basis. Munich Re’s net loss estimate for each event is 18% and 11% respectively of its net tangible assets and Swiss Re’s net loss estimate for each event is 11% and 10% respectively of its net tangible assets.  However, the comparison is of limited use as Munich’s is on an aggregate VaR basis and Swiss Re’s is on the basis of pre-tax impact on economic capital of each single event.

Most reinsurers disclose their PMLs on an occurrence exceedance probability (OEP) basis. The OEP curve is essentially the probability distribution of the loss amount given an event, combined with an assumed frequency of an event. Other bases used for determining PMLs include an aggregate exceedance probability (AEP) basis or an average annual loss (AAL) basis. The AEP curves show aggregate annual losses and how single event losses are aggregated or ranked when calculating (each vendor has their own methodology) the AEP is critical to understand for comparisons. The AAL is the mean value of a loss exceedance probability distribution and is the expected loss per year averaged over a defined period.

An example of the potential misleading nature of disclosed PMLs is the case of Flagstone Re. Formed after Hurricane Katrina, Flagstone’s business model was based upon building a portfolio of catastrophe risks with an emphasis upon non-US risks. Although US risks carry the highest premium (by value and rate on line), they are also the most competitive. The idea was that superior risk premia could be delivered by a diverse portfolio sourced from less competitive markets. Flagstone reported their annual aggregate PML on a 1 in 100 and 1 in 250 year basis. As the graph below shows, Flagstone were hit by a frequency of smaller losses in 2010 and particularly in 2011 that resulted in aggregate losses far in excess of their reported PMLs. The losses invalidated their business model and the firm was sold to Validus in 2012 at approximately 80% of book value. Flagstone’s CEO, David Brown, stated at the closing of the sale that “the idea was that we did not want to put all of our eggs in the US basket and that would have been a successful approach had the pattern of the previous 30 to 40 years continued”.

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Flagstone CAT losses

The graphs below show a sample of reinsurer’s PML disclosures as at end Q1 2013 as a percentage of net tangible assets. Some reinsurers show their PMLs as a percentage of capital including hybrid or contingent capital. For the sake of comparisons, I have not included such hybrid or contingent capital in the net tangible assets calculations in the graphs below.

US Windstorm (click to enlarge)

US windstorm PMLs 2013

US & Japan Earthquake (click to enlarge)

US & Japan PMLs 2013

As per the S&P article, its important to look at the shape of PML curves as well as the levels for different events. For example, the shape of Lancashire PML curve stands out in the earthquake graphs and for the US gulf of Mexico storm. Montpelier for US quake and AXIS for Japan quakes also stand out in terms of the increased exposure levels at higher return periods. In terms of the level of exposure, Validus stands out on US wind, Endurance on US quake, and Catlin & Amlin on Japan quake.

Any investor in this space must form their own view on the likelihood of major catastrophes when determining their own risk appetite. When assessing the probabilities of historical events reoccurring, care must be taken to ensure past events are viewed on the basis of existing exposures. Irrespective of whether you are a believer in the impact of climate changes (which I am), graphs such as the one below (based off Swiss Re data inflated to 2012) are often used in industry. They imply an increasing trend in insured losses in the future.

Historical Insured Losses (click to enlarge)1990 to 2012 historical insured catastrophe losses Swiss ReThe reality is that as the world population increases resulting in higher housing density in catastrophe exposed areas such as coast lines the past needs to be viewed in terms of todays exposures. Pictures of Ocean Drive in Florida in 1926 and in 2000 best illustrates the point (click to enlarge).

Ocean Drive Florida 1926 & 2000

There has been interesting analysis performed in the past on exposure adjusting or normalising US hurricane losses by academics most notably by Roger Pielke (as the updated graph on his blog shows). Historical windstorms in the US run through commercial catastrophe models with todays exposure data on housing density and construction types shows a similar trend to those of Pielke’s graph. The historical trend from these analyses shows a more variable trend which is a lot less certain than increasing trend in the graph based off Swiss Re data. These losses suggest that the 1970s and 1980s may have been decades of reduced US hurricane activity relative to history and that more recent decades are returning to a more “normal” activity levels for US windstorms.

In conclusion, reviewing PMLs disclosed by reinsurers provides an interesting insight into potential exposures to specific events. However, the disclosures are only as good as the underlying methodology used in their calculation. Hopefully, in the future, further detail will be provided to investors on these PML calculations so that real and meaningful comparisons can be made. Notwithstanding what PMLs may show, investors need to understand the potential for catastrophic events and adapt their risk appetite accordingly.